Hafiz of Shiraz: Thirty Poems: An Introduction to the Sufi

Hafiz of Shiraz: Thirty Poems: An Introduction to the Sufi Master I read the poems and THEN I read the preface and introduction Now I feel I should read it again. Hafiz a quarry of imagery in which poets of all ages might mine Ralph Waldo Emerson Hafiz was born at Shiraz, in Persia, some time after , and died there inHe is, then, an almost exact contemporary of Chaucer His standing in Persian literature ranks him with Shakespeare and Goethe A Sufi, Hafiz lived in troubled times Cities like Shiraz fell prey to the ambitions of one marauding prince after another and knew little peace The nomads of Central Asia finally overthrew the rule of these princes, and led to the establishment of the succeeding Timurid Dynasty It is of utmost literary interest that a poet who has remained immensely popular and most frequently quoted in his own land should, for the universality and grace of his wisdom and wit, be known outside the land of his birth as he used to be, the subject of veneration among literati both in Europe and the United States The time for revival of interest in a poet of such cosmopolitan appeal is overdue His poems celebrate the love, wine, and the fellowship of all creatures This volume, first published in , brings back into print at last the renderings, the most beautiful and faithful in English, of this greatest of Persian writers Not my favorite translation compilation of Hafiz still good though. His poetry isof Sufi Structure much like Rumi Divine must read. I m interested in knowingabout Iran and this is their beloved poet But, as usual, poetry is not my forte I did like some of the imagery, and perhaps that is the most important aspect Apparently Goethe was a huge fan of Hafiz, in honor of whom he wrote West stlicher Divan a collection of poems addressing the engagement of German Middle Eastern, Latin Persian, and Christian Muslim In some introductory material to that collection Goethe wrote this, which I used as an epigraph to my b I m interested in knowingabout Iran and this is their beloved poet But, as usual, poetry is not my forte I did like some of the imagery, and perhaps that is the most important aspect Apparently Goethe was a huge fan of Hafiz, in honor of whom he wrote West stlicher Divan a collection of poems addressing the engagement of German Middle Eastern, Latin Persian, and Christian Muslim In some introductory material to that collection Goethe wrote this, which I used as an epigraph to my book Wittgenstein in Exile Who would the poem understandMust go into the poem s land.Who would the poet understandMust go into the poet s lands Praise to be God Those afar who know are near and those near but without discernment, are afar Hafiz


About the Author: Hafez

H fez Khw ja Shams ud D n Mu ammad fe e Sh r z was a Persian poet whose collected works The Divan are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature and are to be found in the homes of most people in Iran, who learn his poems by heart and still use them as proverbs and sayings His life and poems have been the subject of much analysis, commentary and interpretation, influencing post 14th century Persian writingthan any other authorThemes of his ghazals are the beloved, faith, and exposing hypocrisy His influence in the lives of Persian speakers can be found in Hafez readings f l e h fez, Persian and the frequent use of his poems in Persian traditional music, visual art, and Persian calligraphy His tomb is visited often Adaptations, imitations and translations of his poems exist in all major languages.Though Hafez is well known for his poetry, he is less commonly recognized for his intellectual and political contributions A defining feature of Hafez poetry is its ironic tone and the theme of hypocrisy, widely believed to be a critique of the religious and ruling establishments of the time Persian satire developed during the 14th century, within the courts of the Mongol Period In this period, Hafez and other notable early satirists, such as Ubayd Zakani, produced a body of work that has since become a template for the use of satire as a political device Many of his critiques are believed to be targeted at the rule of Amir Mobarez Al Din Mohammad, specifically, towards the disintegration of important public and private institutions He was a Sufi Muslim.His work, particularly his imaginative references to monasteries, convents, Shahneh, and muhtasib, ignored the religious taboos of his period, and he found humor in some of his society s religious doctrines Employing humor polemically has since become a common practice in Iranian public discourse and persian satire is now perhaps the de facto language of Iranian social commentary.


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