Paperback ´ Homo faber Epub Ú

Homo faber Max Frischs Homo faber ist eines der wichtigsten und meistgelesenen B cher desJahrhunderts Der Ingenieur Walter Faber glaubt an sein rationales Weltbild, das aber durch eine Liebesgeschichte nachhaltig zerbricht Kein andere zeitgen ssischer Roman stellt derart ehrlich wie hintergr ndig die Frage nach der Identit t des modernen Menschen


About the Author: Max Frisch

Max Rudolph Frisch was born in 1911 in Zurich the son of Franz Bruno Frisch an architect and Karolina Bettina Frisch n e Wildermuth After studying at the Realgymnasium in Zurich, he enrolled at the University of Zurich in 1930 and began studying German literature, but had to abandon due to financial problems after the death of his father in 1932 Instead, he started working as a journalist and columnist for the Neue Z rcher Zeitung NZZ , one of the major newspapers in Switzerland With the NZZ he would entertain a lifelong ambivalent love hate relationship, for his own views were in stark contrast to the conservative views promulgated by this newspaper In 1933 he travelled through eastern and south eastern Europe, and in 1935 he visited Germany for the first time.From 1936 to 1941 he studied architecture at the ETH Zurich His first and still best known project was in 1942, when he won the invitation of tenders for the construction of a public swimming bath right in the middle of Zurich the Letzigraben.In 1947, he met Bertolt Brecht in Zurich In 1951, he was awarded a grant by the Rockefeller Trust and spent one year in the U.S After 1955 he worked exclusively as a freelance writer His experience of postwar Europe is vividly described in his Tagebuch Diary for 1946 1949 it contains the first drafts of later fictional works.During the 1950s and 1960s Frisch created some outstanding novels that explored problems of alienation and identity in modern societies These are I m Not Stiller 1954 , Homo Faber 1957 and Wilderness of Mirrors Gantenbein 1964 In addition, he wrote some highly intelligent political dramas, such as Andorra and The Fireraisers He continued to publish extracts from his diaries These included fragments from contemporary media reports, and paradoxical questionnaires, as well as personal reflections and reportage he fell in love with a woman called Antonia Quick in 1969.Max Frisch died of cancer on April 4, 1991 in Zurich Together with Friedrich D rrenmatt, Max Frisch is considered one of the most influential Swiss writers of the 20th century He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Marburg, Germany, in 1962, Bard College 1980 , the City University of New York 1982 , the University of Birmingham 1984 , and the TU Berlin 1987 He also won many important German literature prizes the Georg B chner Preis in 1958, the Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels in 1976, and the Heinrich Heine Preis in 1989 In 1965 he won the Jerusalem Prize for the Freedom of the Individual in Society.Some of the major themes in his work are the search or loss of one s identity guilt and innocence the spiritual crisis of the modern world after Nietzsche proclaimed that God is dead technological omnipotence the human belief that everything was possible and technology allowed humans to control everything versus fate especially in Homo faber and also Switzerland s idealized self image as a tolerant democracy based on consensus criticizing that as illusion and portraying people and especially the Swiss as being scared by their own liberty and being preoccupied mainly with controlling every part of their life.Max Frisch was a political man, and many of his works make reference to or, as in Jonas und sein Veteran, are centered around political issues of the time.information was taken fromhttp en.wikipedia.org wiki Max_Frisch



10 thoughts on “Homo faber

  1. Ian "Marvin" Graye Ian "Marvin" Graye says:

    April 20, 2011 I bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80 s.It s only a couple of hundred pages, so when Praj asked me to review it, I thought, hey, why not re read it even though I very rarely re read books.April 22, 2011 Re reading this novel has been a total revelation.Firstly, I had previously rated it four stars from memory Now I have upgraded it to five stars.It s not just good, it s great, one of the best books I ve read.Secondly, I haven


  2. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Is everything in life a coincidence, or are things predestined for us How much do the decisions that we make in life influence the outcome , even down to the smallest of details For globe trotting Walter Faber this is a conflict that is never really resolved, through the misadventures of a strange semi mid life crisis, Frisch writes a poignant and sometimes shocking novel as Faber struggles to maintain his previously unwavering belief in technology, whilst human connections


  3. Warwick Warwick says:

    And now here at last is a real book for grown ups Intelligent and utterly unsentimental, Homo Faber would, I feel, have been wasted on me if I d read it ten years ago now it strikes me as extraordinary This is unlike most novels, which, if not actually aimed at people in their late teens and early twenties, seem to resonate most strongly with that intense and exciting age group As it happens, Walter Faber, the central character of this novel, does not read novels at all He can t s


  4. Manny Manny says:

    Warning contains major spoilers for Sophie s WorldManfred, my inner German child, is looking even smugger andannoying than usual I m not a child any , he informs me I m grown up I read Max Frisch s Homo Faber You are a child, Manfred, I sigh You re only three Three and a half, says Manfred with a little less confidence Three and a half if you like, I agree And you didn t understand that book It was too difficult for you Did so, says Manfred Okay, Manfred, I say Warning contains major spo


  5. BlackOxford BlackOxford says:

    A Swiss Heart of DarknessAn engineer with an engineering outlook on life, the eponymous Homo Walter Faber believes in the randomness of existence But he fails to recognise that such randomness is equivalent to a kind of cosmic spontaneity And that such spontaneity implies some sort of spirit He insists on the absolute disjunction between spirit and matter The former is emotional, sentimental and soft The latter is masculine and what constitutes reality, what can be measured, assembled and A Swi


  6. Jan-Maat Jan-Maat says:

    What a difference a reread makes Now I want to seize everybody in turn by the lapels and say read this book and then read it again.Unusually I know when I had the book for the first time, the Easter of 1995, there s an inscription in my Mother s handwriting on a flyleaf with that date Now I ve read it again, but also read it for the first time You can t read the same book twice since you never can be the same reader.The narrator doesn t see things that way He is told technology..the kna What a differe


  7. Edward Edward says:

    I had never heard of this book, or of its author, but boy am I glad I decided to buy it on a whim It is a work that deserves to stand with Camus and Sartre in its penetration of the modern condition an understanding of which is in each case elucidated through the perspective of a misanthrope The protagonist, Faber, is an engineer, who is characterised by certain stereotypically male traits he lacks empathy, and is logical and analytical to the point of inhumanity He treats significant event I had never heard


  8. Praj Praj says:

    Nothing is harder than to accept oneself Max Frisch Walter Faber is a paradigm of collective identity v s self identity, rationality v s irrationality and providence v s concurrence counter positioning free will You cannot find yourself anywhere except in yourself Frisch portrays the contradictory worlds of methodical reasonableness and the quandary of being a mortal Walter believes in what he nurtures As a technologist working for UNESCO, he lives in the present and connects withNothing is harder than to accept on


  9. Anne Anne says:

    oh my god I am so glad to be done with this tortuous book I appreciate the other reviewers who point out the reasons for this story s existence It is very well written and I suppose it serves to remind us not to live like robots, to have feelings Fortunately I don t live like a robot and I already have many feelings, thank you very much, so for me reading this was like spending hours and hours with a depressed and depressing very sad old man who is telling me all his regrets without even real oh my god I am so glad to be


  10. Matt Matt says:

    This book is required reading in many schools in Germany Crazy idea What are the children supposed to get out of it And so are the ratings and reviews here and elsewhere by the young ones Unfavorable I have, I believe, seen the film one time But have forgotten all about it.Homo Faber is Walter Faber Engineer Lives by the motto f r einen Ingen r ist nichts zu schw r Constructs his world around technology Writes letters in the desert after an emergency landing on a typewriter mech This book is required reading in many schools in G


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