Science Secrets: The Truth about Darwin's Finches,

Science Secrets: The Truth about Darwin's Finches, Einstein's Wife, and Other Myths Was Darwin really inspired by Gal pagos finches Did Einstein s wife secretly contribute to his theories Did Franklin fly a kite in a thunderstorm Did a falling apple lead Newton to universal gravity Did Galileo drop objects from the Leaning Tower of Pisa Did Einstein really believe in God Science Secrets answers these questions and many others It is a unique study of how myths evolve in the history of science Some tales are partly true, others are mostly false, yet all illuminate the tension between the need to fairly describe the past and the natural desire to fill in the blanks Energetically narrated, Science Secrets pits famous myths against extensive research from primary sources in order to accurately portray important episodes in the sciences Alberto A Mart nez analyzes how such myths grow and rescues neglected facts that are captivating than famous fictions Moreover, he shows why opinions that were once secret and seemingly impossible are now scientifically compelling The book includes new findings related to the Copernican revolution, alchemy, Pythagoras, young Einstein, and other events and figures in the history of science I tried, I really did My mind is just not on this track right now It s well written, and interesting, but I couldn t get into it For 8 weeks RANDOM THOUGHTS AND NOTES ON THIS BOOK Complete description of book Was Darwin really inspired by Gal pagos finches Did Einstein s wife secretly contribute to his theories Did Franklin fly a kite in a thunderstorm Did a falling apple lead Newton to universal gravity Did Galileo drop objects from the Leaning Tower of Pisa Did Einstein really believe in God Science Secrets answers these questions and many others It is a unique study of how myths evolve in the history of science Some talesRANDOM THOUGHTS AND NOTES ON THIS BOOK Complete description of book Was Darwin really inspired by Gal pagos finches Did Einstein s wife secretly contribute to his theories Did Franklin fly a kite in a thunderstorm Did a falling apple lead Newton to universal gravity Did Galileo drop objects from the Leaning Tower of Pisa Did Einstein really believe in God Science Secrets answers these questions and many others It is a unique study of how myths evolve in the history of science Some tales are partly true, others are mostly false, yet all illuminate the tension between the need to fairly describe the past and the natural desire to fill in the blanks Energetically narrated, Science Secrets pits famous myths against extensive research from primary sources in order to accurately portray important episodes in the sciences Alberto A Mart nez analyzes how such myths grow and rescues neglected facts that arecaptivating than famous fictions Moreover, he shows why opinions that were once secret and seemingly impossible are now scientifically compelling The book includes new findings related to the Copernican revolution, alchemy, Pythagoras, young Einstein, and other events and figures in the history of science.FROM THE PREFACE the ground that each historian tries to cover is often broad, so errors creep in wherever one relies on common knowledge and trusts other writers words It takes much work to authenticate some common hearsay it takeswork to falsify, and some conjectures are too seductive to resist. Consciously or not, writers inflate tales to sell books As rightly noted by J rgen Neffe, another good biographer of Einstein, speculations evolve into anecdotes that are then proliferated in book length studiesMany writers echo traditional stories rather than dig up documentary facts, interpreting bits of evidence to match conjectures rather than to test them This book analyzes several famous topics in the history of science the lore of Pythagoras, the Copernican revolution, the alchemical quest for the Philosophers Stone, Darwin s path to evolution, the mysteries of electricity, Einstein s relativity, and the rise of eugenics Legends about Galileo have propagated partly because people were willing to parrot the claims of specialists, believing authority, rather than evidence.The author proves the validity of meticulous and thorough research, finding the real sources, and confirming or condemning the use of alternative sources as an easier way of constructing a theory, book, or belief What interested me the most was the author s confrontation of conjectures and going to enormous lengths to find the sources of facts and fiction in sciences Any student heading into any sciences, should read this book Numerous new information were made available in the book, either by footnotes, text or bibliography I m including some of my personal thoughts in a spoiler, merely reminding me of interesting aspects of the book, but perhaps interesting to read for others as well view spoiler Apart from the issues mentioned above, discussed in the book, there were others that made me read nonstop, such as Why scientist changed their minds about the motion of the earth Centuries ago, teachers taught that the sun circles Earth, and it seemed obvious now they teach the contrary, and it seems obvious It s easy to accept basic scientific knowledge without knowing why scientists believe it, but that would make science seem like just another doctrine The confusion about the birth dates of historical figures, due to the two different calendars Gregorian and Julian the early discovery of radium, the efforts to produce gold from chemical processes, the history of alchemy the phenomenon behind J.K Joanne Rawling and Harry Potter and the Philosopher s Stone the importance of myths in modern society Charles Darwin and evolution The myth of the finches The role of Pythagoras Another book which should be read in this regard is The Map That Changed the World by Simon Winchester, which clarifies, or claims to be the beginning of the evolutionary theory, which would allow Darwin to become famous.https www.goodreads.com review show It was a document that was to change the face of a science indeed, to create a whole new science to set in train a series of scientific movements that would lead, eventually, to the inquiries of Charles Darwin, to the birth of evolutionary theory, and to the burgeoning of an entirely new way for human beings to view their world and their universe The inevitable collision between the new rationally based world of science and the old ecclesiastical, faith directed world of belief was about to occur and in the vanguard of the new movement, both symbolically and actually, was the great map, and now this equally enormous atlas that John Cary of the Strand was about to publish, and the revolutionary thinking that lay behind their making Benjamin Franklin 1752 , Pythagoras, Promotheus and the ancient myth of lightning In epic Greek poems, the god of sky and thunder, Zeus, hid fire from humans, yet Prometheus managed to steal it with the long stalk of a fennel plant Prometheus stole fire from the god of thunder Franklin caught electric fire from the thundering sky hide spoiler A great read for those who appreciate thought and debate There never seems to be definite answers, and nothing remains static long enough to become the ultimate fact.Alberto A Mart nez confronts our way of collecting information, and our application thereof in sciences or life To accomplish this he thoroughly researched documents in which the contradictions were pointed out in the famous myths and theories The author confirmed the necessity of proper research, of finding as many primary sources as possible.For anyone applying the approach in the book to our current society, it becomes clear why the debate between butter and margarine exists, for instance Why the agenda and the source of finances behind research should be questioned The solution is to trust evidence instead of experts If someone claims something, even if it is Galileo writing about Aristotle, or Newton writing about Galileo, or even the latest, best biographer writing about Einstein, we should abstain from simply believing what they say, unless they cite the specific evidence to which they refer The reasons for the various churches to reject or accept the different theories of the old scholars are discussed in some detail Enough to bring a new understanding for the less scholarly reader who just want to learn , without completing a dissertation on the subject The clashes between the different groups Catholics, Lutherans, Protestants They all interpreted the Bible differently and they all were willing to kill to protect their interests Scientists lost their lives in apposing religious leaders Conclusion Although original documents are the best, it is impossible for millions of people to have access to them for various reasons Suffice to say, that it will be like standing at the edge of the ocean, trying to stop a tsunami of inaccuracies if tried to provide original proof of everything For instance, Dan Brown s Da Vinci Code claimed enormous hours of research and a great number of researchers However, the reader does not have the same access and resources to verify the accuracy of the claims in the book The journalistic principle anecdote also applies never allow a good story to be ruined by facts Very true in any novel s case indeed Conjectures often rule, particularly in genres such as biographies and historical fiction The book illustrates the various interpretation of Newton, the apple and gravity which was not the first time the theory was published, so by the way Translations enforce the idea of different interpretation, as we all know Another great book to consider, and there are many , is The Jesus Mysteries Was the Original Jesus a Pagan Godby Timothy Freke, Peter Gandy, which enforces the similarities and differences of the various religions and the role it played in the interpretation of science and history Secrets The Truth about Darwin s Finches, Einstein s Wife, and Other Myths is about controvercy and interpretation, projection and subjective interests in science It stirs debate It reminds us of our weaknesses in attempting research Reading through all the myths that became fact, and facts being rejected as myths, a cacophony of voices are tumbling around in the brain rejecting the findings, offering new opinions, all insisting to be heard What a mess Further readinghttps www.upress.pitt.edu BookDetaiGREAT STUFF LOVED IT EXCELLENT Some of this was very difficult to read for a layperson because of the amount of technical and scientific jargon, but the chapters that dealt specifically with historical facts or stories were very interesting and mostly engaging I vividly remember being taught in high school physics class that Galileo dealt a death blow to the scientific clout of the Catholic Church with his cheeky experiments off the Leaning Tower Martinez not only clarifies what we know and what we don t know about some o Some of this was very difficult to read for a layperson because of the amount of technical and scientific jargon, but the chapters that dealt specifically with historical facts or stories were very interesting and mostly engaging I vividly remember being taught in high school physics class that Galileo dealt a death blow to the scientific clout of the Catholic Church with his cheeky experiments off the Leaning Tower Martinez not only clarifies what we know and what we don t know about some of the stories we tell about science and scientists, but explains why certain stories havetraction than others and how they tell usabout ourselves than about the figures they purport to illuminate.Adding this little review I wrote for my sci fi fan club newsletter As Alberto Martinez points out in this book, we tend to give scientists and their discoveries a kind of heroic, even superhuman sheen when we tell their stories They are the brave explorers, wise heretics, and bold iconoclasts we wish we could be, striking down the ignorance of the bigoted and uneducated while blazing the trail for enlightened future generations The truth, of course, is that they are as human and fallible as the rest of us, and the stories we tell about their exploits and discoveries are as much about how we want to see ourselves as they are about the history of science.In Science Secrets, Martinez aims to set the record straight about a number of popular conceptions not all of them mis about scientific discoveries ranging from the influence of Pythagorean ethics on alchemists to whether Darwin and Einstein believed in God These names come up frequently throughout the book, forming a running theme of influence and interpretation Some of the chapters can be difficult to get through, especially the jargon laden explanations of Coulomb s experiments and the development of Einstein s theory of relativity Other chapters, such as those about alchemy, the development of the theory of natural selection, and Newton s discovery of gravity, are witty, informative, and easy to comprehend There are a lot of surprises here, like Einstein s embrace of eugenics science, the fate of Newton s apple tree, Tycho Brahe s golden nose, and the unexpected influence of paganism on Galileo s thought.Martinez also gives the reader food for thought about how to approach everyday decisions about what to accept as true As he provides the facts and explains the differences in types of documentation primary, secondary, first hand, hearsay, fiction, etc , he gives the reader an education not only in the history itself, but in how to write and understand history In the age of the Internet, it can be hard to pin down what really happened in any given event, but we tend to enjoy the benefits of a large number of sources in history it can be muchdifficult because we have few primary sources in many cases, and the sources we do have are often carefully massaged to represent the historical figures in very specific ways, either positively or negatively It s helpful to approach any authoritative history or widely told story with a critic s eye Popular notions of history ancient or current do not always need to be debunked outright, but certainly we can and should question the reason why that particular telling strikes a chord within us and what it can teach us about the way we look at the world I only really read the chapter about whether Einstein believed in God, but that chapter at least was really good Also, the font in this book is AMAZING I m dying to know what kind of font it is.

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