The Battle of Salamis: The Naval Encounter that Saved

The Battle of Salamis: The Naval Encounter that Saved Greece—and Western Civilization On a late September day inBC Greek warships faced an invading Persian armada in the narrow Salamis Straits in the most important naval battle of the ancient world Overwhelmingly outnumbered by the enemy, the Greeks triumphed through a combination of strategy and deception More than two millennia after it occurred, the clash between the Greeks and Persians at Salamis remains one of the most tactically brilliant battles ever fought The Greek victory changed the course of western history halting the advance of the Persian Empire and setting the stage for the Golden Age of AthensIn this dramatic new narrative account, historian and classicist Barry Strauss brings this landmark battle to life He introduces us to the unforgettable characters whose decisions altered history Themistocles, Athens great leader and admiral of its fleet , who devised the ingenious strategy that effectively destroyed the Persian navy in one day Xerxes, the Persian king who fought bravely but who ultimately did not understand the sea Aeschylus, the playwright who served in the battle and later wrote about it and Artemisia, the only woman commander known from antiquity, who turned defeat into personal triumph Filled with the sights, sounds, and scent of battle, The Battle of Salamis is a stirring work of history



10 thoughts on “The Battle of Salamis: The Naval Encounter that Saved Greece—and Western Civilization

  1. Bettie Bettie says:

    Description On a late September day in 480 B.C., Greek warships faced an invading Persian armada in the narrow Salamis Straits in the most important naval battle of the ancient world Overwhelmingly outnumbered by the enemy, the Greeks triumphed through a combination of strategy and deception More than two millennia after it occurred, the clash between the Greeks


  2. Jane Jane says:

    More like 3.5 Fascinating and well written summary of the Battle of Salamis, a crucial Greek naval win in the Greco Persian War of the 400s B.C The author has made this narrative interesting and not too scholarly for the general reader such as myself We are informed as to the causes of the war, important battles up to that time Artemesium naval battle ending in a draw


  3. Rindis Rindis says:

    Barry Strauss has written a very accessible account of the second time the Greeks fought off the Persian Empire He spends a good amount of time on the background the Ionian revolt, the general configuration of the Persian court, etc Along the way, we good descriptions of triremes, the geography, and the backgrounds of many of the important people So it s was a little surpr


  4. Ensiform Ensiform says:

    An intensely detailed account of the sea battle between the quasi united Greeks, officially under a Spartan commander but heavily influenced by the strategy of Athenian Themistocles, and Xerxes tremendouslynumerous army Strauss follows Herodotus and other sources, accepting them as reliable for the most part, but sweetening the account with hundreds of details from modern schol


  5. Baelor Baelor says:

    I read this in anticipation of 300 Rise of an Empire I studied Classics in college, so I went into this book with a knowledge advantage An overview of the Battle of Salamis with appropriate framing Ionian Revolt to Artemisium Thermopylae through the Persian retreat Strauss draws heavily upon Herodotus and Aeschylus While his extensive notes and source discussion at the end of the bo


  6. Joshua Joshua says:

    One should approach the reading of this book with a drinking game Every time Barry Strauss says the word Herodotus one should take a drink I don t actually advise this as the reader is sure to die of alcohol poisoning given the fact that Herodotus is on almost every page of this wonderful book.Strauss s book was simply incredible for the fact that every page felt dramatic, captivating, i


  7. Iron Mike Iron Mike says:

    Great book about this integral battle The author does a great job of bringing that classic naval conflict to life Each chapter starts with a scene from one of the many personalities involved The highlight, for me, are all the maps Maps for each chapter, plus bigger maps at the beginning of the book There s also a very short, but important intro to the different boats, which helps when you re


  8. Diane Diane says:

    To the layman the Persian Greek war consisted of only a few very important battles when in reality it consisted of many One of the most underrated of these unknown encounters is the battle that took place in the Salamis straits between the island of that same name and the Attica coastline Instead of focusing on the popular battles of Thermopylae or Marathon, Barry Strauss gives us an in depth snap


  9. Steven Peterson Steven Peterson says:

    Barry Strauss The Battle of Salamis provides a good rendering of this important sea battle that turned back the invasion of Greece, led by Persian King Xerxes After breaking through the defensive position of the Spartans at Thermopylae, the Persian army then moved southward and sacked Athens All that stood between Xerxes and the taking of Greece was the Greek fleet This book begins with a description o


  10. Christopher Christopher says:

    Mr Strauss, in this book, describes the events and personalities that surround one of the greatest naval battles in the ancient world And yet, this book isthan that Despite it s short page count, this is perhaps one of the best summations of the Persian Greek War of 480 B.C Mr Strauss builds up the tension in the first half of the book by describing both the Greek and Persian strategies and battles that led


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